Category Archives: Conference

Public Health Informatics Virtual Event on July 16-18, 2013 – Call for Abstracts!

Connect with colleagues at your own convenience!

ph informatics virtual event

This virtual event provides the opportunity to learn and discuss the latest initiatives in public health informatics with attendees from all over the country and internationally. Call for abstracts is now open and will continue until May 31, 2013. This year’s theme is “Strengthening Public Health – Health Care Collaboration.” Abstract submissions are encouraged in the following areas:

1)  Informatics policy and practice: virtual sessions will focus on national and international policy issues and their implications for public health informatics programs; applied informatics projects for programmatic support; and new initiatives

Examples might include:

  • ICD-10 CM/PCS –deadline for implementations 10/1/2014
  • Meaningful Use & Electronic Health Records
  • Interstate data exchange
  • Data exchange to support ACOs

2)  Research & Innovation: virtual sessions will focus on informatics research and technological innovation to public health and clinical settings.

Examples might include:

  • Applying analytics to new and existing data sources
  • Leveraging Big Data for population and public health
  • Learning health systems to support integration of primary care and public health
  • Novel technologies for population and public health education and communication (mobile, web, social media)

3)  Supporting Public Health Evidence Based through Informatics Practice: virtual sessions will focus on strengthening public health through knowledge sharing, evaluation, visualization and reporting.

Examples might include:

  • Evaluation methodologies and findings
  • Decision support for population health Health status and performance management dashboards
  • Community Health Assessments as part of the community health improvement process
  • Return on Investment (ROI) and Value of Information (VOI) analyses for informatics programs and systems

If any of the items above relate to your area of work, do not miss the opportunity to submit an abstract!

Help us get the word out and share this blog post with your colleagues and friends! And if you’re ready to submit an abstract go straight ahead here.

Meeting sponsors include CDC, NACCHO, and ASTHO.

Health IT at the 2013 Public Health Preparedness Summit

preparedness summit logo

People are always asking, “What is informatics and how does informatics affect me?” or “What does informatics mean to my everyday job?”  At the 2013 Public Health Preparedness Summit, there will be some great examples of how emergency preparedness is supported by innovative technology and is informed by good informatics.  In other words – not just what technology to use, but how to put this technology to good meaningful use.

A number of these sessions will focus on social media, messaging during a disaster, and new tools to reach out to different populations. These presentations highlight how critical informatics has become in preparing for and recovering from disasters.

Some of these sessions are below:

  • Dispense Assist: Online Screening Tool for Mass Dispensing and Vaccination -Implementation/Training Workshop:  This workshop will introduce you to Dispense Assist (DA) a free, online screening tool for mass dispensing and vaccination available for use by any interested jurisdiction.
  • Emergency Messaging for the Electronic Age: This workshop will explore the explosion of social media and how it has changed the way in which those in the public health field must look at risk communication and information sharing, especially in times of emergency.
  • Video-Savvy Crisis Response Workshop: Using YouTube, Skype and uStream for Effective Communication in an Emergency: You’ll learn how to use YouTube, Skype, and UStream to communicate effectively during a crisis using tools you may already have.
  • Innovations in Public Health Emergency Alerting and Notification: Presentations will address the impact of the public health capabilities on emergency alerting and information sharing practices, including the Epidemic Information Exchange and Health Alert Network programs.
  • FluCare: A Mobile Texting Service to Support Antiviral Medication Use during an Influenza Pandemic: This session will highlight the development of a mobile texting service to provide medication information and support for people who are prescribed antivirals during an influenza pandemic.
  • Cell Phone Mapping and Disaster Mental Health Preparedness Planning in Under-Resourced Black Communities: Presenters will discuss cell phone GPS software and computer-based mapping platforms that will allow community groups to easily collect data to inform planning activities. This offers an opportunity to address the digital divide and build resilience in under-resourced black communities.
  • Utilization of Mobile Health (mHealth), Social Media and Emerging Technologies for Public Health and Disaster Preparedness-Lessons Learned and Policy Implications: This sharing session will cover how mobile health, social media, and other emerging technologies offer an opportunity to improve disaster preparedness. The research presented during this session aims to identify notable practices at local health departments in using these platforms for preparedness efforts, identifying barriers to use, and assessing how to increase uptake of these methods. 
  • Effective Use of Social Media in Public Health: Promoting a Practice Exchange in Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness and Response: This session will explore how an online compendium of preparedness tools from across the country and a social marketing campaign created an interactive disaster preparedness community for state and local planners.
  • Prototype Tool for Analyzing Email Traffic in Public Health Emergency Operations Centers: This session will solicit input from participants on a prototype tool that CDC and Lockheed Martin have developed to analyze and visualize email traffic within an emergency response center.

We hope that you will join us at this year’s Summit to learn more about the role of ePublic Health & Informatics in emergency preparedness. Are you on Twitter? Follow @prepsummit for the latest information and use the hashtag #phps13 to follow the online conversation. To see what other sessions will be offered at the Summit and to register, please visit http://www.phprep.org/.

Insights from Kansas Information Management and Exchange Workshop

Recently Vanessa Holley and I were asked to facilitate a workshop with local health departments (LHDs) in Kansas.  We were slated to discuss how to help LHDs make two decisions:

  • Do they need an electronic health record (EHR) system?
  • If/how should they connect to the health information exchange (HIE)?

Through the course of the discussions, it quickly became apparent that the decisions to have an EHR or connect to the HIE were only part of the story and in some ways were over emphasized because they are easier to conceptualize.  But the discussions began to broaden and clarify some of the issues.  As it turns out, I think we actually stumbled upon a pretty good road map for ePublic Health.

Let’s look closer at what I mean.

Before you can effectively take advantage of any technology or HIE option:

  • Step 1: develop the future vision for your LHD and clarify both what value and what services you plan to offer your community.  You first need to determine what services your LHD will be focused on in the new world of healthcare.  This is critical because if, for example, your health department is not going to continue to heavily invest in clinical services, then considering a practice management or EHR system may not be a good investment – despite current needs.  On the other hand if you plan to increase your case management and care coordination role in the community, you’ll want to be sure whatever system you purchase or build takes into account those requirements in order to best support your work.
  • Step 2: is to create or update your statewide collaborative Health Information Management Plan and planning body with a wide representation from LHD, state, and program personnel.  Even if this already exists, ensure that representatives are both well informed and doing a complete job of communicating out decisions that are made.  To begin this step you have to begin to coordinate at a heightened level with your state and neighboring LHDs.  In Kansas, they have had a great relationship with their state and a very active LHD association.  However, they still realized that they could benefit by making a more formal body that is charged with coordinating and collaboratively developing the Health Information Management Plan for public health.  This is different from the statewide HIT plan because it is much more than information technology and is solely focused on creating one public health voice for health departments throughout the state.  This is so critical because your partners need to hear a coordinated and unified voice for public health.  Also, most of the Meaningful Use solutions are designed and managed at the state level.  Therefore it is imperative that LHDs are collaborating with the state to understand how their information needs will be met and how these solutions will interact with their local systems.  There has been so much to keep up with in the fast pace of Meaningful Use that many states have not yet formalized this body and its charge.  However states that have recently created such a coordinating body, like Ohio, report huge successes in making decisions and dealing with unforeseen issues related to the changing world of ePublic Health (See CDC Charter Lite Template).
  • Step 3:  gain a clearer appreciation for your LHDs capabilities, needs, and desires. This can often involve an assessment of the systems you have, the needs that are met and the gaps that exist.  It might even be good for the aforementioned Health Information Planning group to survey LHDs and display results.  This will help LHDs identify peers they can work with and peers who can offer peer assistance or advice about vendors.  It is important that this not be done from a standpoint of competition or condemnation, but rather of bettering each health department.
  • Step 4: delineate the benefits of practice management and EHR systems. Though clinical operations and responsibilities for LHDs can vary wildly, most LHDs have some sort of specialty clinics that they run (examples include STD/HIV, TB, Maternal and Child Health, etc).  And though the state is often preparing systems to meet Meaningful Use requirements, LHDs must come up with their own solutions for meeting the demands of these clinics.  Complicating matters, LHDs often have cross over between local clinic information needs and programmatic reporting to state or federal partners.  In our discussions in KS, we discovered that even with smaller programmatic clinics there are good reasons to deploy one or both of these types of systems.  Especially since costs have decreased dramatically in the past 5 years.  Benefits include more efficient programmatic reporting, increasing overall clinic efficiency resulting in a higher volume of visits, increased recovery of costs and billing, decreased need for record space, etc.  Once you have determined that the benefits offered by these systems fit within your LHD vision, conduct a review of specific systems based on your unique requirements, and understand the costs and benefits you can expect, then you can make an informed decision as to which system you should deploy (see NACCHO’s All-Systems-Go tool).
  • Step 5:  know your requirements for exchange and assess/pursue your local HIE options to support those requirements. For this final step, our discussions in KS turned to the HIE options that exist in their state.  Since they have been a leader in Health Information Exchange and LHDs have been heavily involved, they have a couple of really nice options.  In their state, LHDs can get basic HIE services for free, which include direct secure messaging and access to a provider web portal.  And KS LHDs are finding really interesting ways to use these services – like using the web portal for case investigations and sending follow-up testing requests and outbreak summary reports to physicians using direct secure messaging.  The state health department is working to connect their reporting systems to LHDs through the HIE, but work remains to make local and state systems interoperate in this fashion.  It also came to light that there were other exchange requirements that the LHD had that aren’t a part of their “free” set of services, but have enough value that they will want to understand the costs/benefits and pursue those options.  For example, local clinic managers would like to perform clinical assessments on their clients and provide test results and other clinical notes to the referred provider or receive visit summary documents when the referred visit is complete.  Though there is still much work to do, what was clear was that in the not so distant future one could imagine LHDs in KS having an efficient and interoperable connection to the state and other community based systems through their HIE.  In order to have this sort of success, it is critical that your LHD get involved, stay involved, or increase involvement locally with your HIE options.  Be aware of what services your HIEs provide, how these services can benefit your LHDs vision for the future, and see if you can negotiate special rates for LHDs.

If LHDs earnestly and systematically pursue these five steps, I believe they will have a thriving and successful transition into becoming an efficient LHD of the ePublic Health future.  At NACCHO, we’re working with our ePublic Health workgroup to develop more detailed tools that will support LHDs who go through each of these steps – so stay tuned.  I want to give a special thanks to the Kansas Health Foundation, Kansas Association of Local Health Departments, and Kansas Department of Health and Environment for allowing me into their rapidly developing world of ePublic Health.